Studies prove that consumption of sugar and cancer are connected

Studies prove that consumption of sugar and cancer are connected

Sugar lurks in many places within our food system today. From certain breads and juices, to children’s cereal, it has been discretely introduced into the food supply on a catastrophic level. Over the years, much research has been conducted regarding the toxic effects of sugar, and the conclusions have all been quite troubling – cancer being a common trend within many of the studies.

The cancer problem is not slowing down

Over 1.5 million cancer cases are predicted to occur in the United States in 2013, and sadly, approximately half a million of these cases are expected to die. In 2008 alone, there were over 12 million cases of cancer worldwide, and this figure is expected to climb to over 20 million by the year 2030. If society can’t call this a worldwide epidemic, then what is?

With these types of statistics, it seems that the current approaches in place to prevent or even treat cancer, simply aren’t working. At this point, it’s probably safe to say that it’s going to take more than a “cancer walk” to stop this horrible trend once and for all. Interestingly enough, many researchers are now shifting their focus to understanding environmental influences (like eating behaviors) by means of putting a new light on the cancer problem.

Research shows that sugar is a perfect fuel for cancer cells

Studies have shown that cancer cells primarily run on glucose. With this being the case, it makes sense to regulate sugar intake in order to prevent cancerous cells from forming, or to stop them from spreading if a person has already been diagnosed.

Unfortunately, the Westernized approach to treating cancer doesn’t involve much credible dietary input or advice. Tactics employed nowadays, as far as treatment options go, seem to revolve more around chemotherapy and medications rather than which foods or substances to incorporate or avoid. Much of the research on sugar, in relation to this disease, has proven that cancer patients should certainly be watching how much of it they are consuming. In simpler terms, less sugar can undoubtedly equate to better controlling the invasive nature of cancer.

Sugar hides in many places

Sugar is literally everywhere, and it doesn’t seem as if too many people are concerned with how prevalent it is within the food system nowadays.

• Store-bought dressings
• Kid’s snacks
• Juices
• Soda
• Canned foods
• Enriched breads
• Processed meats
• Baked goods
• Sports drinks
• Nutrition bars
• Nutritional supplements

Society must remind itself that if leading a conventional lifestyle, it is going to be difficult to avoid these types of foods. If looking to improve your health, and avoid diseases like cancer, shifting to a more holistic (low sugar) lifestyle seems to be a great preventative measure to take. Consuming less sugar, eating more vegetables, drinking more filtered water, and eating cleaner foods are all appropriate strategies that have been scientifically proven to work as far as disease prevention goes.

The end message with sugar and cancer

There is now an obvious connection between diseases like cancer and the consumption of sugar. If looking to avoid cancer, or ultimately beat it if already diagnosed, watching your added sugar intake is a crucial method to employ. The scientific facts behind the claims are obviously real, so it’s time that more people look into assessing their diets if looking to avoid many of these fatal diseases. It’s not just cancer that society has to worry about these days either, as sugar consumption has also been linked to conditions like heart disease and diabetes as well.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.wcrf.org/cancer_statistics/world_cancer_statistics.php

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.3322/caac.21166/abstract

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2006/06/060630094933.htm

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/040112_sugar_consumption_cancer_prevention_cells.html#ixzz2Rs9EKY1D

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